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OMC having problems getting it up.

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Valore atag
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So our OMC core has never been particularly young (foxes aside, and he's probably like 200 in fox years by now anyway) but mechanically a lot of our members were actually really on point, which combined with pretty good game sense tended to allow us to roll most other people in any game we played.

There's this aim practice program that I use on Steam called Aim Hero, its basically just an FPS shooting gallery that can be configured for various games which gives you some basic stats on your reflexes, accuracy and such.

Would you guys be interested in picking it up, then we can have a weekly leaderboard/scoreboard to see how everyone's aim measures up. Dick swinging for all, and fun poking to be had I'm sure xD

I know Cerb has previously posted some free ones as well, so if there are any alternative suggestions as to what's good that would work too.
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Posted May 10, 18 · OP · Last edited May 10, 18
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I've always wondered, the time you spend "practicing" your aim...is that time you'd normally be playing the game you're "practicing" for is this like extra time?
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Posted May 10, 18
Valore atag
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Eh, there's a bit more to it. Like I find when I played R6 or OW, the more I practiced beforehand, the more confident I tended to be in the game, so the less I actually consciously thought about my aim. That freed up more room in my head which I think did have a positive effect on my game sense.

Its probably because my aim does lag behind you guys, I've never been a natural FPS player.

Overall I'd spend a few minutes warming up or practicing, but the trade off is the actual games I did play were better in quality.
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Posted May 10, 18 · OP · Last edited May 10, 18
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I get warming up, I even get practising, what I don't get is doing so outside of the game you're playing...or outside of any game for that matter. I don't play either of those terrible games (:p) but for me a warm-up in CS is either some DM or an aim map which is literally a map, for aiming, however since it's in game ALL of the practice translates to game performance (unlike practising outside of game).

It'd probably be fine just to get you in the mindset of a shooter...kind of like a football team playing some cricket, it's practice in so much as it switches your hand-eye back on but the skills aren't directly translatable. For example; in both football and cricket you throw the ball however if you tried to throw a cricket ball as though passing a football you'd probably be sub-optimal.

Same thing goes in FPS albeit not to the same extent as you are using a narrower range of awareness, muscles, skills etc. I dunno man, just never appealed to me. I know guys who spend hours the night before a tournament practising (in the game the tournament is for obviously) and I also know guys who don't practice, like at all, ever, and yet are just as successful since the volume of tournament play is adequate for them. Really hoping you can derive the rest of this, my post is getting too long again.
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Posted May 10, 18 · Last edited May 10, 18
Valore atag
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No its interesting, you're right about the possible issue of not actually practicing something that translates into useful result ingame. But I think there's something to be said about the way athletes break down what they need to do into micro actions, and then make sure each micro action is polished so when it gets brought together, the overall result is good.

In my case, I use the aim games solely to get myself in the zone reflex aim wise, so the flicking and reacting becomes more innate. The problem with having a casual warmup round, is if I miss a shot, I tend to start overthinking following shots more, and it becomes a vicious cycle and I tense up and it makes me even worse. That has drip down effects on my overall gameplay because I then start consciously thinking about my shooting, which then affects my game sense, positioning, and so on.

My innate flick reflex aim tends to be very average, so the more I can grind it into something I don't have to think about, the better my other aspects of play become, which I tend to focus on anyway.

I'd totally use an aim map if those existed for R6, but you know how shit Ubisoft is, they dont even have a fucking shooting range. For OW they do have a practice range, but the bots tend to move very predictably, so that builds its own range of bad habits.
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Posted May 10, 18 · OP · Last edited May 10, 18
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I guess the thing about a sport is that you can generally break down training into whatever it is you need at the time, in gaming we're always going to be restricted by whatever the developer/modders/mappers make available to us.

Personally if the games I played didn't have any kind of fast paced instant or near instant respawn modes I think I'd try and find a game that did for the sole purpose of training. I've never liked practice in anything I do, I'm more of a 'just show up and do it' kind of person so I'm probably always going to be biased against training since I've never seen any personal positive effects. Was happy enough to do it with the corp as a way of generating cohesion but otherwise I don't generally train or practice anything for myself.

Anyway having played with most of OMC in various games I gotta say it aint aim we're sorely lacking, it's fucking awareness :p

I used to do the same thing in every sport I've ever played as well, fucking hated training (with the exception of rep squads, they were shorter and more intense, had a better feeling) but loved game day. I actually started playing rugby union for a club as a way of getting in more games during my school's rugby league down time since the school played weekday games and the club weekend. Skipped every school training I could and only went to one club training session a week :p

Nothing beats practical experience, train as much as you like but it won't compare. Of course this works better if you actually enjoy whatever it is you're doing, when playing feels like practice find something else.
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Posted May 10, 18 · Last edited May 10, 18
Valore atag
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wrote:
Nothing beats practical experience, train as much as you like but it won't compare. Of course this works better if you actually enjoy whatever it is you're doing, when playing feels like practice find something else.

See I totally agree with that, but I think there's some places training does help me where playing a pickup game doesn't, simply because you can control what happens. My aim is one, where I can't always practice in a game, because some idiot might decide he wants to DPS, meaning you end up playing another class.

I've had some success just ignoring everyone else and doing what I can, and to a certain extent that's something I miss about MWO xD But in OW/R6, unless you play certain characters which I'm bad at, there's very little you can do to hard solo carry.
wrote:
Of course this works better if you actually enjoy whatever it is you're doing, when playing feels like practice find something else.

Here's the funny thing, ironically, its all linked. I don't enjoy practice. I enjoy the teamwork aspects of the games I play. But if I don't practice, when the team game actually comes, I'll be shit at what I'm supposed to do, and I won't enjoy it. So I practice, in order to enjoy what I want to enjoy :d

It seems so circular, but that seems to be how it works for me.
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Posted May 11, 18 · OP · Last edited May 11, 18
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Have you tried not being bad?

I'm kidding :p
See one of my favourite rugby league players is Cooper Cronk and apparently he simply wasn't skilled enough to make it into first grade and so spent every waking second he could practising until he was good enough. Even when he made it into the NRL he still has the reputation as the hardest working player off the paddock and I fucking admire that...I've just never been that kind of person and honestly I don't ever actually want to be that kind of person :p

Maybe if I find something I care enough about but in general I don't do things I'm not good at, if I try something and I don't feel like I'll naturally get to a good spot just by playing/competing I sure as shit won't be training for it in the hopes that works I'll just move on lol
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Posted May 11, 18
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In a real game you get far fewer opportunities to aim and fire in comparison to a training game which generally provides far more opportunities.
Posted May 16, 18
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wrote:
In a real game you get far fewer opportunities to aim and fire in comparison to a training game which generally provides far more opportunities.
Surely that's dependent on the game? CS DM you do almost nothing but move and aim...My point was simply that I don't feel isolated training is necessarily the best thing, it doesn't hurt to do it a little (when coupled with actual game play) but even professional sport is moving away from it as a primary training method. What you learn in training, unfortunately, very rarely translates precisely...ask any sportsman.

Again though not saying it's bad, however if you can get your head in the right space you will be able to teach yourself far more from playing an actual game than any simulator can currently achieve. If you are like Valore and don't like to (or even if you cannot) separate playing a game for practice versus playing to win and you want to get better without losing then sure, practice your little ass off. Difference is what makes the world go round.

There's probably some balance to be struck it's just that in my experience the balance would HEAVILY weigh in favour of the practical over the practice. I am assuming here that people have around my own level of inherent ability (most do but some won't so sorry if you don't it's just the way it goes) since it's hard for me to relate to people with significantly greater or lesser "skill".
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Teamwork is essential, it gives the enemy someone else to shoot at.
Posted May 16, 18 · Last edited May 16, 18
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